Nadia Hannan Final Project

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 Choreograph Me! - A Score for Dance

This piece has two main aims: to explore and encourage participatory art and to investigate an alternative way of archiving and sharing dance. 

The performance of the piece consisted of an Installation in which I put myself in production studio 1 with a video camera thats feed was then streamed to the television in the MCM Production Lobby. The door between the two rooms remained closed throughout the performance. I created two email addresses, DAchoreographer@gmail.com and Digtialartdancer@gmail.com. I placed a laptop signed in as DAchoreographer on the table in the lobby along with a sign and instructions for what the participants should do. I signed into the other screen name from the desktop in studio 1 and projected the conversation on the screen. Essentially what the participants were asked to do was send commands through the gchat for me to execute. I performed the installation twice on Monday November 21, from 10:30-11am and from 2-2:45pm. After each installation I took screenshots of the "conversation" and compiled them into a score. I then posted the score along with instructions on how to create and installation and a score of ones own on a tumblr.  

As a dancer and a person interested in performance and the power of performance, I have been encountering the question of how to archive and preserve performance, most specifically dance, both in my classes and also in my own work. Since dance is ephemeral in nature, a piece is constantly shifting and changing every time it is performed. There are many choreographers, dancers, scholars, and educators wrestling with the question of how to most efficiently and accurately preserve a dance so that it can live long after its initial performance or after the people involved in creating that performance are gone. For me, the commands and the participation of other people, performers and non-performers alike, are the essence of any dance that is created using this set up. The written score captures those commands and therefore any dance created using this score, or another score created in a similar manner, will have that essence at its core, even if the dance itself looks or feels different.

  

Above: Set up from the outside


 
Above: Screenshot of conversation 

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